erikkwakkel

erikkwakkel:

Medieval rockstar

The last page of a medieval book is usually a protective flyleaf, which is positioned between the actual text and the bookbinding. It was usually left blank and it therefore often filled up with pen trials, notes, doodles, or drawings. This addition I encountered today and it is not what you’d expect: a full-on drawing of a maiden playing the lute, which she holds just like a guitar. A peaceful smile shines on her face. I love this rockstar lady, so unexpectedly positioned at the end of the book, trying to catch the reader’s attention as he is closing it.

Pic: London, British Library, Sloane MS 554 (more here).

mudwerks
artmastered:

Aquamanile in the Form of Aristotle and Phyllis [unknown artist], late 14th/early 15th century, Netherlands, bronze, 32.5 x 17.9 x 39.3 cm, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
An aquamanile is a type of vessel used for pouring water onto the hands before a meal - or before Mass in a religious context. I’m not totally sure where exactly the water flows from, but I’m guessing it has something to do with Aristotle’s head or neck. Phyllis, the daughter of a Thracian king in Greek mythology, is perched on the back of the philosopher. The story goes that Aristotle wanted to prove to young men that a seductive woman will even work her magic on the elderly. Here, he is shown in a humiliating pose that would have been highly amusing to guests observing the object at a dinner table.

artmastered:

Aquamanile in the Form of Aristotle and Phyllis [unknown artist], late 14th/early 15th century, Netherlands, bronze, 32.5 x 17.9 x 39.3 cm, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

An aquamanile is a type of vessel used for pouring water onto the hands before a meal - or before Mass in a religious context. I’m not totally sure where exactly the water flows from, but I’m guessing it has something to do with Aristotle’s head or neck. Phyllis, the daughter of a Thracian king in Greek mythology, is perched on the back of the philosopher. The story goes that Aristotle wanted to prove to young men that a seductive woman will even work her magic on the elderly. Here, he is shown in a humiliating pose that would have been highly amusing to guests observing the object at a dinner table.